A Game of Casting

Game of Thrones hemorrhages more characters in a single episode than most other series do in multiple seasons. No one is safe from George R.R. Martin’s bloodlust – the best most characters can hope for is a quick beheading or short trip out of the Moon Door. Without all those deaths, however, the number of new characters introduced in each book would quickly bloat the series, resulting in Martin’s publishing schedule going from “once every decade, maybe” to “when the sun rises in the west and sets in the east, when the seas go dry and mountains blow in the

Queen Without a Throne

The scene takes place in a dimly lit chamber whose narrow stained glass windows cast a feeble light on the body of a dead boy: the former King Joffrey. But the scene’s first shot is not of Joffrey. It’s of Cersei and Tommen, Joffrey’s mother and younger brother. Cersei Lannister stands in the exact center of the shot, but it’s Tommen the camera favors, putting him in focus while a blurry Cersei stands in the background. Within seconds, Tywin Lannister, Cersei’s father and Tommen and Joffrey’s grandfather, appears. The camera switches to an angle behind him as he enters, his

Dune: Can There Ever Be A Good Adaption?

As a kid I was always fascinated by weird things. Like a lot of the children of the 80s, I was exposed to a wide variety of cinema at a young age, thanks to the proliferation of video stores. Most of this stuff we probably shouldn’t have been watching but we did anyway, often because it was a science fiction and/or fantasy film, or even a horror film if we managed to get an older kid to rent it (although the guy behind the counter usually didn’t care who was renting what).